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Definition by Wiktionary (Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License)

To effectively combat crime in the EU, member states recognise four main principles: bringing member States’ laws closer together; coordinating proceedings; recognising other member States’ decisions; and upholding the rights of the individual. (See Enlargement, EU citizenship : Consular and diplomatic protection, Judicial-criminal: Victims rights, Police: Crime prevention network)

the fight against drugs involves preventing the illegal possession and supply of drugs, as well as organised crime and drug-related criminality. (See Drugs: Drugs-related crime)

An act that violates the law of a state or endangers the public welfare. activities are coordinated at EU level to fight crime, in particular organised crime, which operates across borders. (See general)

Europol, the european judicial network and the european crime prevention network facilitate cooperation between EU member states in the fight against organised crime. (See Organised crime)

An act or omission which is prohibited by criminal law. each state sets out a limited series of acts (crimes) which are prohibited and punishes the commission of these acts by a fine, imprisonment or some other form of punishment. - (read more on Crime)  

A wrong that the government has determined is injurious to the publicand that may therefore be prosecuted in a criminal proceeding. crimes includefelonies and misdemeanors.

A crime is a wrongdoing classified by the state or congress as a felony or misdemeanor.A crime is an offence against a public law. this word, in its most general sense, includes all offences, but in its more limited sense is confined to felony.The term offence may be considered as having the same meaning, but is usually understood to be a crime not indictable but punishable, summarily or by the forfeiture of a penalty.Felony. A felony is a serious crime punishable by at least one year in prison. some family law felonies include kidnapping and custodial interference (in some states).People convicted of felonies lose certain rights, such as the right to vote or hold public office. during the term of sentence, the convicted person may also be prohibited from making contracts, marrying, suing or keeping certain professional licenses. upon release from prison, the convict may also be required to register with the police.Misdemeanor. A misdemeanor is a crime for which the punishment is usually a fine and/or up to one year in a county jail. often a crime which is a misdemeanor for the first offense becomes a felony for repeated offenses. all crimes that are not felonies are misdemeanors.Crimes are defined and punished by statutes and by the common law. most common law offences are as well known and as precisely ascertained as those which are defined by statutes; yet, from the difficulty of exactly defining and describing every act which ought to be punished, the vital and preserving principle has been adopted; that all immoral acts which tend to the prejudice of the community are punishable by courts of justice.Crimes are 'mala in se,' or bad in themselves, and these include all offences against the moral law; or they are 'mala prohibita,' bad because prohibited, as being against sound policy which, unless prohibited, would be innocent or indifferent. crimes may be classed into such as affect:- 1. religion and public Worship: 1. Blasphemy. 2. disturbing public worship.- 2. the sovereign Power: 1. Treason. 2. misprision of treason.- 3. the current Coin: 1. counterfeiting or impairing it.- 4. public justice: 1. bribery of judges or jurors, or receiving the bribe. 2. Perjury. 3. prison breaking. 4. Rescue. 5. Barratry. 6. Maintenance. 7. Champerty. 8. compounding felonies. 9. misprision of felonies. 10. Oppression. 11. Extortion. 12. suppressing evidence. 13. negligence or misconduct in inferior officers. 14. obstructing legal process. 15. Embracery.- 5. public Peace: 1. challenges to fight a duel. 2. Riots, routs and unlawful assemblies. 3. Affrays. 4. Libels.- 6. public Trade: 1. Cheats. 2. Forestalling. S. Regrating. 4. Engrossing. 5. Monopolies.- 7. Chastity: 1. Sodomy. 2. Adultery. 3. Incest. 4. Bigamy. 5. Fornication.- 8. decency and Morality: 1. public indecency. 2. Drunkenness. 3. Violatiug the grave.- 9. public police and Economy: 1. common nuisances. 2. keeping disorderly houses and bawdy houses. 3. Idleness, vagrancy, and beggary.- 10. public Policy: 1. Gambling. 2. illegal lotteries.- 11. Individuals: 1. Homicide, which is justifiable, excusable or felonious. 3. Mayhem. 3. Rape. 4. Poisoning, with intent to murder. 5. administering drugs to a woman quick with child to cause, miscarriage. 6. concealing death of bastard child. 7. assault and battery, which is either simple or with intent to commit some other crime. 8. kidnapping. 9. false imprisonment. 10. Abduction.- 12. private Property: 1. Burglary. 2. Arson. 3. Robbery. 4., Forgery. Counterfeiting. 6. Larceny. 7. receiving stolen goods, knowing them to have been stolen, or theft-bote. 8. malicious mischief.- 13. the Public, Individuals, Or their Property, according To the intent Of the Criminal: 1. Conspiracy.    this entry contains material from Bouvier's legal Dictionary, a work published in the 1850's.

A crime is a wrongdoing classified by the state or congress as a felony or misdemeanor.Felony. A felony is a serious crime punishable by at least one year in prison. some family law felonies include kidnapping and custodial interference (in some states).People convicted of felonies lose certain rights, such as the right to vote or hold public office. during the term of sentence, the convicted person may also be prohibited from making contracts, marrying, suing or keeping certain professional licenses. upon release from prison, the convict may also be required to register with the police.Misdemeanor. A misdemeanor is a crime for which the punishment is usually a fine and/or up to one year in a county jail. often a crime which is a misdemeanor for the first offense becomes a felony for repeated offenses. all crimes that are not felonies are misdemeanors.

crimecrime (krīm), n.[f. crime, fr. l. crimen judicial decision, that which is subjected to such a decision, charge, fault, crime, fr. the root of cernere to decide judicially. see certain.] 1. any violation of law, either divine or human; an omission of a duty commanded, or the commission of an act forbidden by law. 2. gross violation of human law, in distinction from a misdemeanor or trespass, or other slight offense. hence, also, any aggravated offense against morality or the public welfare; any outrage or great wrong. "to part error from crime."note: crimes, in the english common law, are grave offenses which were originally capitally punished (murder, rape, robbery, arson, burglary, and larceny), as distinguished from misdemeanors, which are offenses of a lighter grade. see misdemeanors. 3. any great wickedness or sin; iniquity. no crime was thine, if 'tis no crime to love. 4. that which occasion crime. [obs.] the tree of life, the crime of our first father's fall.   similar words(7) 

 attempt to commit a crime  partner in crime  victimless crime  vice crime  war crime  capital crime  a charge or a crime 

(n.)

That which occasion crime.  

(n.)

Gross violation of human law, in distinction from a misdemeanor or trespass, or other slight offense. Hence, also, any aggravated offense against morality or the public welfare; any outrage or great wrong.  

(n.)

Any violation of law, either divine or human; an omission of a duty commanded, or the commission of an act forbidden by law.  

(n.)

Any great wickedness or sin; iniquity.  

Noun1. (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes" (synonym) law-breaking (hypernym) transgression, evildoing (hyponym) capital offense (derivation) accuse, impeach, incriminate, criminate (classification) criminal law (class) kidnap, nobble, abduct, snatch2. an evil act not necessarily punishable by law; "crimes of the heart" (hypernym) transgression, evildoing (derivation) incriminate, imply, inculpate

coir

Efrad = n. treachery; crime

n. HeS

n. HeS

the word crime comes from the Latin crimen (genitive criminis), from the Latin root cernō and greek κρινω = "I judge". originally it meant "charge (in law), guilt, accusation."

vitium, dedecus, malum, facina -oris

any action that violates criminal laws established by political authority.

fear of sinning (imaginary crime)

An act committed in violation of a law.

crime; offense  

crime; filthiness; impurity  

Common misspellings

    • ccrime
    • srime
    • csrime
    • scrime
    • krime
    • kkrime
    • ckrime
    • kcrime
    • chrime
    • hcrime
    • rime
    • crimee
    • crimi
    • crimea
    • crimae
    • crima
    • crim
    • criime
    • crieme
    • creime
    • craime
    • criame
    • creeme
    • creme
    • crme
    • crimme
    • crine
    • crinme
    • crimne
    • crinne
    • crie
    • crrime
    • clime
    • cllime
    • caime
    • carime
    • cerime
    • cime

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Typos

  • xrime
  • srime
  • drime
  • frime
  • vrime
  • rime
  • crimw
  • crims
  • crimd
  • crimf
  • crimr
  • crim
  • crume
  • crjme
  • crkme
  • crlme
  • crome
  • crme
  • crine
  • crihe
  • crie
  • crije
  • crike
  • ceime
  • cdime
  • cfime
  • cgime
  • ctime
  • cime

Anagrams

  • reimc
  • iercm
  • remic
  • cemir
  • rcmie
  • rmcie
  • cremi
  • imecr
  • cmeir
  • ceimr
  • cirem
  • ecimr
  • rmice
  • ricem
  • rcmei
  • merci
  • ercim
  • ermic
  • ecmir
  • ircem
  • cmier
  • rmiec
  • icrme
  • recim
  • ecrim
  • irmec
  • iremc
  • rcime
  • icerm
  • mecri
  • ecirm
  • iecrm
  • recmi
  • meric
  • cimre
  • iecmr
  • cierm
  • imerc
  • mreci
  • cimer
  • mierc
  • imcre
  • mirce
  • mcrie
  • iermc
  • ecrmi
  • rmeic
  • criem
  • cermi
  • mrcei
  • mcire
  • mecir
  • cmeri
  • ermci
  • mrcie
  • cmire
  • reicm
  • micre
  • mcrei
  • icmre
  • miecr
  • imcer
  • mriec
  • irmce
  • remci
  • ecmri
  • erimc
  • eicmr
  • cirme
  • ceirm
  • mcier
  • iemcr
  • iemrc
  • meicr
  • meirc
  • rimce
  • icemr
  • icrem
  • cmrie
  • ircme
  • eicrm
  • rcemi
  • rmeci
  • crmei
  • micer
  • imrce
  • rimec
  • mreic
  • cerim
  • mrice
  • riecm
  • rmcei
  • rciem
  • crime
  • icmer
  • imrec
  • riemc
  • creim
  • ercmi
  • ciemr
  • ricme
  • mceir
  • cmrei
  • irecm
  • ericm
  • cemri
  • rceim
  • crmie
  • mceri
  • mirec

Word analysis of crime

Length5
Vocalscrime
Consonantscrime
MD5bc8fba5b68a7babc05ec51771bf6be21
SHA1cdde326f00b45b819a6d8a6788fe423bbf88de67