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Definition by Wiktionary (Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License)

appearancep*pear"ance (&?;), n. [f. apparence, l. apparentia, fr. apparere. see appear.] 1. the act of appearing or coming into sight; the act of becoming visible to the eye; as, his sudden appearance surprised me. 2. a thing seed; a phenomenon; a phase; an apparition; as, an appearance in the sky. 3. personal presence; exhibition of the person; look; aspect; mien. and now am come to see it thy appearance answer loud report. 4. semblance, or apparent likeness; external show. pl. outward signs, or circumstances, fitted to make a particular impression or to determine the judgment as to the character of a person or a thing, an act or a state; as, appearances are against him. there was upon the tabernacle, as it were, the appearance of fire. ix. 15. for man looketh on the outward appearance. xvi. 7. judge not according to the appearance. vii. 24. 5. the act of appearing in a particular place, or in society, a company, or any proceedings; a coming before the public in a particular character; as, a person makes his appearance as an historian, an artist, or an orator. will he now retire, after appearance, and again prolong our expectation? 6. probability; likelihood. [obs.] there is that which hath no appearance. 7. (law) the coming into court of either of the parties; the being present in court; the coming into court of a party summoned in an action, either by himself or by his attorney, expressed by a formal entry by the proper officer to that effect; the act or proceeding by which a party proceeded against places himself before the court, and submits to its jurisdiction. l.   similar words(3) 

 to put in an appearance  first appearance  in spite of appearance 

(n.)

The coming into court of either of the parties; the being present in court; the coming into court of a party summoned in an action, either by himself or by his attorney, expressed by a formal entry by the proper officer to that effect; the act or proceeding by which a party proceeded against places himself before the court, and submits to its jurisdiction.  

(n.)

The act of appearing or coming into sight; the act of becoming visible to the eye; as, his sudden appearance surprised me.  

(n.)

The act of appearing in a particular place, or in society, a company, or any proceedings; a coming before the public in a particular character; as, a person makes his appearance as an historian, an artist, or an orator.  

(n.)

Semblance, or apparent likeness; external show. pl. outward signs, or circumstances, fitted to make a particular impression or to determine the judgment as to the character of a person or a thing, an act or a state; as, appearances are against him.  

(n.)

Probability; likelihood.  

(n.)

Personal presence; exhibition of the person; look; aspect; mien.  

(n.)

A thing seed; a phenomenon; a phase; an apparition; as, an appearance in the sky.  

Noun1. outward or visible aspect of a person or thing (synonym) visual aspect (hypernym) quality (hyponym) agerasia (derivation) appear2. the event of coming into sight (antonym) disappearance (hypernym) happening, occurrence, natural event (hyponym) reappearance (derivation) appear3. formal attendance (in court or at a hearing) of a party in an action (synonym) appearing, coming into court (hypernym) attendance, attending (derivation) appear4. a mental representation; "I tried to describe his appearance to the police" (hypernym) representation, mental representation, internal representation (hyponym) illusion, semblance (derivation) look, appear, seem5. the act of appearing in public view; "the rookie made a brief appearance in the first period"; "it was Bernhardt's last appearance in America" (antonym) disappearance, disappearing (hypernym) arrival (hyponym) apparition (derivation) appear6. pretending that something is the case in order to make a good impression; "they try to keep up appearances"; "that ceremony is just for show" (synonym) show (hypernym) pretense, pretence, pretending, simulation, feigning

Cochwydd = n. ruddy appearance

Coegymddangosiad = n. a false appearance

Cynwedd = n. first appearance

Eddrith = n. varied appearance

Edrych = n. appearance; v. to look, to behold

Edrychedigaeth = n. appearance

Glwyd = a. of fair appearance

Gwrthymddangos = n. counter appearance

Irwedd = n. green appearance

Rhith = n. guise, appearance, semblance, an embryo

Rhithiant = n. appearance

Rhithiogaeth = a. appearance

Rhithiogi = v. to give appearance

Tegwedd = a. of fair appearance

Tremiant = n. an appearance

Tremid = n. an appearance

Ymddangosiad = n. an appearance

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the act of showing up in court as either plaintiff, defendant, accused or any other party to a civil or criminal suit. - (read more on Appearance)  

the required coming into court of a plaintiff or defendant in anaction either by himself or through his attorney. An appearance is a voluntarysubmission to the jurisdiction of the court.

the literal, or by filing of papers or pleadings, coming into court by a party or the attorney for a party.Signifies the filing common or special bail to the action.The appearance, with all other subsequent pleadings supposed to take place in court, should (in accordance with the ancient practice) purport to be in term time. It is to be observed, however, that though the proceedings are expressed as if occurring in term time, yet, in fact, much of the business is now done, in periods of vacation.The appearance of the parties is no longer (as formerly) by the actual presence in court, either by themselves or their attorneys; but, it must be remembered, an appearance of this kind is still supposed, and exists in contemplation of law. the appearance is effected on the part of the defendant (when be is not arrested) by making certain formal entries in the proper office of the court, expressing his appearance; or, in case of arrest, it may be considered as effected by giving bail to the action. On the part of the plaintiff no formality expressive of appearance is observed.In general, the appearance of either party may be in person or by attorney, and, when by attorney, there is always supposed to be a warrant of attorney executed to the attorney by his client, authorizing such appearance.But to this general rule there are various exceptions; persons devoid of understanding, as idiots, and persons having understanding, if they are by law deprived of a capacity to appoint an attorney, as married women, must appear in person. the appearance of such persons must purport, and is so entered on the record, to be in person, whether in fact an attorney be employed or not.There must be an appearance in person in the following cases: 1st. An idiot can appear only in person, and as, a plaintiff he may sue in person or by his next friend; 2d. A married woman, when sued without her hushand, should defend in person and when the cause of action accrued before her marriage, and she is afterwards sued alone, she must plead her coverture in person, and not by attorney.. when the party pleads to the jurisdiction, be must plead in person. A plea of misnomer must always be in person, unless it be by special warrant of attorney.An infant cannot appoint an attorney; he must therefore prosecute or appear by guardian.A lunatic, if of full age, may appear by attorney; if, under age, by guardian.When an appearance is lawfully entered by the defendant, both parties are considered as being in court. and if the defendant pleads to issue, defects of process are cured but not, if he demurs to the process, or, according to the practice of some courts, appears de bene esse, or otherwise conditionally.In criminal cases, the personal presence of the accused is often necessary. It has been held, that if the record of a conviction of a misdemeaner be removed by certiorari, the personal presence of the defendant is necessary, in order to move in arrest. of judgment: but, after a special verdict, it is not necessary that the defendant should be personally present at the argument of it. So, the defendant must appear personally in court, when an order of bastardy is quashed and the reason is, he must enter into a recognizance to abide the order of sessions below. So, in a case, when two justices of the peace, having confessed an information for mishehaviour in the execution of their office, and a motion was made to dispense with their personal appearance, on their clerks undertaking in court to answer for their flues, the court declared the rule to be, that although such a motion was subject to the discretion of the court either to grant or refuse it, in cases where it is clear that the punishment would not be corporal, yet it ought to be denied in every case where it is either probable or possible that the punishment would be corporal; and therefore the motion was overruled in that case. and Wilmot and Ashton, Justices, thought, that even where the punishment would most probably be pecuniary only, yet in offences of a very gross and public nature, the persons convicted should appear in person, for the sake of example and prevention of the like offences being committed by other persons; as the notoriety of being called up to answer criminally for such offences, would very much conduce to deter others from venturing to commit the like.    this entry contains material from Bouvier's legal Dictionary, a work published in the 1850's.

A court filing registering the name of your lawyer or,if you represent yourself, your name as "pro se." your lawyer must file an appearance with the court. all pleadings and notices are then sent to her address which constitutes proper service on you. If you appear without counsel, you are said to appear pro se. once counsel files her appearance, she cannot withdraw her appearance without your permission or leave of court, usually by motion. sometimes courts will not allow counsel to withdraw unless a new lawyer ("successor counsel"), or the party herself, files an appearance. If no successor appearance is filed, courts frequently deny this request, even if the client fails to pay attorney’s fees. counsel then becomes your involuntary servant, but don’t expect zealous advocacy from a slave. you may get what you pay for. Obviously, divorce lawyers view this problem as justification for large retainers.

A court filing registering the name of your lawyer, or, if you represent yourself, your name as "pro se."

a formal submission to the courts by the defendant (respondent) in response to the a complaint or summons.

the act of showing up in court as either plaintiff, defendant, accused, or any other party to a court action.

Appearance may refer to:In physiognomy, Human physical appearance.Appearance in philosophy, see phenomena.In law, Appearance in court.In baseball, number of games a pitcher appears in (see games pitched).Appearances, a 2001 album by Nikkole.Phenomena (disambiguation) regarding automobile appearance

vulticulus, facies

[A20/B34] Kant's appearances are a kind of representation which, as empirically real but transcendentally ideal, are also empirical objects, and are the objects of empirical knowledge and the objects of experience. the matter of all sensible thought is sensation, and our "receptivity" to sensation causes intuitions, which are representations of appearances. appearances themselves contain both intuitive matter (corresponding to sensation) and discursive or conceptual form (which "determines the manifold" of sensation); we know them as "determined objects"--as empirically real objects, the only kind of objects and only kind of reality which we can experience--only after sensation has been synthesized through the transcendental unity of apperception and judgment. An obvious question: if appearances are representations, what are they meant to represent? Clearly, for kant they do not represent things in themselves (or, at least, we cannot know that they do). [B164] On the one hand, there are certain "laws of appearances" which must agree with the conditions of understanding and sensibility (e.g., with the conditions of space and time and with the categories). On the other hand, "things in themselves would necessarily...conform to laws of their own" and since we cannot know these laws (or anything about things in themselves), we cannot assert that appearances represent things in themselves. It seems better to say that for kant appearances are empirical objects and that, in the final analysis, empirical objects for kant turn out to be a strange species of representation. As determined in empirical knowledge, there is no further question as to what appearances are or represent; they simply are empirically real objects. (However, it takes discursive judgment to determine the appearance as an empirical object; as given through intuition, appearances are (represented in intuition as) [A20/B34] "the undetermined object of an empirical intuition".)

an object of experience, when viewed from the transcendental perspective. though often used as a synonym for phenomenon, it technically refers to an object considered to be conditioned by space and time, but not by the categories. (Cf. thing in itself.)

when the mind has a tendency to dream, it is a mistake to keep dreams away from it, to ration its dreams. So long as you distract your mind from its dreams, it will not know them for what they are; you will always be being taken in by the appearance of things, because you will not have grasped their true nature.   

appearance, or force, of waters  

settings for configuring the look of various components of a window or desktop

nounhow a person or thing looks; you could tell from her appearance that she was suffering from anaemia

Common misspellings

    • aappeaaraance
    • aeppeaeraence
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    • eppeerence
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    • ippeirince
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    • ieppeierience
    • ppernce
    • appearancce
    • appearanse
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    • appearace
    • appppearance
    • apepeearance
    • aepepearance
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    • apipiearance
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    • appearrance
    • appealance
    • appeallance
    • appeaaance
    • appeaarance
    • appearaance
    • appeaerance
    • appeareance
    • appeaance

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Typos

  • qppeqrqnce
  • wppewrwnce
  • sppesrsnce
  • xppexrxnce
  • zppezrznce
  • ppernce
  • appearanxe
  • appearanse
  • appearande
  • appearanfe
  • appearanve
  • appearane
  • appwarancw
  • appsarancs
  • appdarancd
  • appfarancf
  • apprarancr
  • apparanc
  • appearabce
  • appearagce
  • appearahce
  • appearajce
  • appearamce
  • appearace
  • aooearance
  • allearance
  • aearance
  • appeaeance
  • appeadance
  • appeafance
  • appeagance
  • appeatance
  • appeaance

Anagrams

  • appeaancer
  • appeaanrce
  • appeacrnea
  • appeaarecn
  • appeacaren
  • appeacraen
  • appearncae
  • appearecan
  • appeancrae
  • appeaanerc
  • appearacen
  • appeancare
  • appeaercna
  • appearcnae
  • appeareanc
  • appeaarnce
  • appeaanecr
  • appearenac
  • appeanraec
  • appeanrace
  • appeaacern
  • appeaacrne
  • appeancear
  • appearneac
  • appeacnrae
  • appearance
  • appeancrea
  • appeaacren
  • appearecna
  • appeacrean
  • appeacnaer
  • appeaernac
  • appeanacer
  • appearnace
  • appeaaercn
  • appeaeancr
  • appeaceran
  • appearaecn
  • appeancera
  • appeacaenr
  • appeaanrec
  • appeaancre
  • appeanaecr
  • appeanecar
  • appeanearc
  • appeanacre
  • appeacnare
  • appeanrcea
  • appeanerca
  • appeanaerc
  • appeacaner
  • appeanreac
  • appeacearn
  • appearanec
  • appeaarnec
  • appeacnrea
  • appeacrane
  • appearcean
  • appearnaec
  • appeaeanrc
  • appearncea
  • appeanarce
  • appeacnear
  • appeaacner
  • appeacanre
  • appeacrnae
  • appeacrena
  • appeanreca
  • appeaarcne
  • appeanerac
  • appearaenc
  • appeaeacrn
  • appearcane
  • appeaearcn
  • appeaaenrc
  • appeanarec
  • appeareacn
  • appeacnera
  • appeaceanr
  • appearcena
  • appeacaern
  • appeaeacnr
  • appeaearnc
  • appeacenra
  • appeaneacr
  • appearcnea
  • appearcaen
  • appeacerna
  • appearneca
  • appeaeracn
  • appeaeranc
  • appeaernca
  • appeaacenr
  • appeacenar
  • appeaaernc
  • appeancaer
  • appeaarcen
  • appearenca
  • appeanecra
  • appeanrcae
  • appeacarne
  • appeaaecrn
  • appeaarenc
  • appeaaencr
  • appeaacnre
  • appeaaecnr
  • appeaercan
  • appearacne

Word analysis of appearance

Length10
Vocalsappearance
Consonantsappearance
MD59aeef72f66f72a93610d89bc3bd9502a
SHA185a7b4e8d512e9696237c4a7690cbe5d9a0bf323